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2.5% or so, these companies have figured out how to make money in a slow growth environment so combined with that, 4%, 5% earnings growth, that's reasonable in the kind of environment that we're in right now. >> no great shakes in terms of earnings growth. >> no. >> but good enough is what you're saying. >> that's right. i think it's good enough. >> what's priced into the market though? i mean, we've got expectations that we'll see much higher prof materialize or what? >> you know, really i think the market, you know, the p.e. ratio, if you look at valuations as far as that metric goes, i mean, the market is not willing to take the pes very high, may inch higher, 14, 14.5 or so, by the end of next year. the market knows we're in a slow growth environment. we're not going to get strong gdp, and it's not willing to assign much of a pe to these earnings. that's going to be a continuation, but next year i think investor confidence is going to improve a little. it's really lagged in this rally, so i think we're just going to be able to inch it up enough to where we have a decent yea
'neill at 9:00 tonight and signed the final agreement. we don't have that environment anymore. maybe that is good for the sunshine law but with intense media scrutiny and day-to-day negotiations it is tougher to get the deal done. i would like for them to go to camp david for one week. lori: with a chance to get spending cuts? will republicans have any leverage? >> there is opportunity to have responsible conversation. lori: that anything done? >> it is possible. the budget that was criticized the president has proposed drastic spending cuts and froze discretionary spending over five years not what democrats would be happy about what would follow if there was a deal. it is maybe a little less likely than one year ago but it is possible. lori: meno bernanke will leave at the end of the term. how will that unfolds? >> now -- now they say tim geithner will go to the head of the federal reserve. [laughter] i think he has had his do but it is a close relationship. it is with the entire board and not just the chairman. on lot of people have known them for a long time. lori: who will handic
hikes, what the environment will be like in washington, especially with a lot of republicans they seem to be running scad. >> that is where just as mayor giuliani said, the republicans should not run scared, they should tell the truth, and get the facts out to the people. >> jim: but they are not doing it. >> they are not doing it. maybe the mainstream media is ignoring them, this is a simple message, if you want to government to grow at the rate it is growing, and you are okay with this big government you see, you have to pay for it, a lot more than we are now, and a lot more than hiking taxes on the rich, now, but they can't get through the noise. >> well i don't see much of a attempt to try to get the facts out to the people, i think that have to figure out a way to connect with the people and be able to tell them the truth. you know margaret thatcher said that the problem with socialism or kd of government that obama is trying tony flick o to inflat sooner or later you run out of other people's money. neil: we might be seeing that now, a lot of americans seeing payroll taxut makeo
environment so attractive and really few alternatives. is it really a function of the global economy, or is it more a function of this money that needs to find a place to go and u.s. equities seems to be best looking game in town? >> well, you know, i do think it's a lill bit of the latter. when you start looking at the velocity of the money, not trying to get too into the financial jargon, but we do have an issue where people are still seeking out safe money. however, if you look at growth of bank lending, commercial bank lending, what we call a credit growth, it's above 6% right now, so we do have banking and financial organizations wanting to lend money, and as they do that, that's going to create the capital to give those fundamentals that we sort of have forgotten about, but there's no denying that when the federal reserve is printing 85 billion a month it will have an effect. keep in mind, still looking at 8%, 10%, s&p corporate earnings growth. let's not get into an argument about top line growth. >> you're talking about the fourth quarter, 8% to 10% in the fourth quarter? >>
the case be made for all women in a college environment? you have been the president of such a school. >> one of the things people think is a single sex school is all women. we have some male professors. the tilt is female, but we have male professors. they are not sitting in a convent. you have other school that are close by. so, none of these children or young people are being koiserred. it's an important point to make. a lot of them think they are going to be. however, i think there are lots of benefits. there are some disadvantages. there are 4,000 plus colleges in the united states. 4,000. you have clernlg colleges for african-american. 45 women's colleges. you have one founded for jewish people, why not variety? i didn't go to a single sex school. a lot of women who are achievers didn't. some want to make that choice. they want to learn and be focused. they want to have the opportunity to learn without the distraction of young men in the room and they are being prepared to go into a world with all the tools that make them unintimidated by men. they have learned how to argument.
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
question, the draft and whether or not we've got enough people. and how do we get them in an environment in which nobody wants to serve and we have a hard time making national security decisions about what to do and make them honestly and intelligently. we've had a pretty lousy record of making intelligent decisions about national security in the last few years. >> i just think it's fascinating that we're now in a position where we need to be transitioning from being a military that is making all of its decisions about dwell time and how much time you got between deployments and who is going to deploy where and when to instead thinking about a mill they're is not at war, that needs to decide what its strength is going to be, its training requirements, its weapons systems are going to be. and the last time we did this really is after vietnam and we've got all these vietnam guys. >> you're absolutely right. if you talk to a guy like marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and you get him against the corner and we're inside the cone of silence and he'll tell you honestly what
an environment of better economic growth. rates might go higher. we think the immediate part of the curve is probably the safest place for the investors who are looking or think rates might be going up. then the other is you need to play the revenue space. there's a lot of high quality credits out there. but the yields are low. you're not really getting compensated. from a risk reward perspective, like health care and transportation, like housing and education offer a lot of value with not a lot of risk. >> so tell me how the fed plays into all of this, peter. there was all that noise last week about the division among fed members on how long the stimulus program should continue or will continue. if rates stay low and they don't fall any further, what's the impact of the growth in the muni bond market? how does that play into it? >> that's a great question. that's one we're talking about here as well. i think it's important to realize that the fed was only beginning to talk about having a debate or a discussion about removing that qe. so they've been anchoring on the long end of the marke
market sounds like a bull compared to that sort of an environment. >> let's talk about what harry just said though because he talked about the large umbrella-type situations that are really going to impact. demographics. >> yeah. >> the fact that the retail investor is gone. we're not going to have the same level of interest in stocks over the long term. he's expecting a big crash second half of the year. >> yeah. he's absolutely right. we've had bun buyer since 666 on the s&p in '09, the corporation itself. nobody else is in this buyer. can you imagine if somebody else does show up for a day or two? we could have a much better market. >> what's going to take us to those all-time highs, what area of the market do you want to be in to ride that wave? >> the multi-nationals. lagged the last couple of years. emerging market economies starting to do a bit better, and those companies that are geared in that direction. look, some of the u.s. companies will do fine, too. earnings are a question mark. that's -- that's part of the problem, but i think as financial and systemic risk mitigate som
just talking about and in saying they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into e lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many cities and many areas, these pollutants, specific ones we're looking at here, hydrocarbons are decreasing. what we're seeing they're increasing and if you look at predictions just from the oil sand development people themselves, they're estimating in the next 50 years they will increase 2.5 times or 150%. if you do back of the envelope calculation if nothing else changes very s
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
of bubble bath with cash. john: today they would. >> it is a much different environment. >> they are more parsimonious today but he also said tell the truth because sooner or later people will find out. that is still a modern day public relations. public relations. >> 100 million people will this is $100,000. public relations. >> 100 million people will we asked total strangers to watch it for us. thank you so much. i appreciate it. i'll be right back. they didn't take a dime. how much in fees does your bank take to watch your money? if your bank takes more money than a stranger, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. woman: my first symptoms were... man: constant tingling in my toes. woman: my leg sometimes will go numb. woman: i had double vision. woman: they said, "you have multiple sclerosis." woman: well, the beginning is the hardest time. man: i kind of had to get a grasp on reality. man: i had to adapt and change very rapidly. woman: i had to learn how to drive with my hands -- yeah, that was interesting. woman: i was a dancer. i don't see walking the way i walk any
environment. if the yield curve starts to stephen as we've seen in the -- to stephen as we've seen in the first weeks of 2013, that will eliminate net interest margin pressure. profitability should improve for the group. >> how much do you care about what's going on in washington over the next two months? >> i think that's important because the austerity measures being talked about in washington will slow general economic growth in the country. and as you know, that's a real driver for bank loan growth. and so if those austerity measures are too much and puts us into possibly a recession or just slower growth, that will affect the outlook for the banks. i think you're going to see that the housing market's going to continue to grow. and that's going to be a real driver to the success of the banks this year. >> okay. now in your note to clients, you say that your four best ideas -- i'll list them. walk us through why you like them. you like discover financial services, fifth third bancorp, pnc financial, and wells fargo. >> yes, when you hook at starting with the last one, wells far
into recession. it's been in a recession type environment for a while. and the only grimace of hope is that the chinese economy has been showing signs of growth and the japanese are earmarking trying to get their growth profile. it's a race to the bottom. last year, there was a lot of risk that people thought we were going to have and didn't happen and then this year, thought there would be a massive allocation out of equities. i think that shows the first quarter is not going to be a one shot off the the risk markets. >> george, thanks for joining us this morning. we appreciate that. and now let's just remind you what else is still to come. two of the biggest names in hedge funds are locking horns over herbalife. we'll tell you what you need to know, coming up. with hotwire's low prices, we can afford to take an extra trip this year. first boston... then san francisco. hotwire checks the competitions' rates every day so they can guarantee their low prices. so our hotels were half price. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ hotwire.com ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash befor
at the environment today and our politicians don't seem to be serious about spending, they seem to think that the public is more concerned with screwing the rich than hitting up programs. are they right? >> people felt that way but myself is that obama, the carry interest rate that allows hedge fund people taxed at capital gains rate, obama defended that. that is one of the big things. that is warren buffett and rich friends. this is disingenuous but the country should be rising up. >> neil: they are not rising up. >> i think this is because it's going to explode. somebody is going to say, my grandchildren and children, this is moral issue being kicked down the road. these people will not deal with it and the republican handling of this was let me just put it this way, just about as stupid as i have ever seen in my lifetime. only matched by what they did the year before. >> neil: well put. happy new year. >> did any of you the streamliner. another nightmare. all safe. but why are so many plain scared? ♪ [ male announcer ] the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going f
talk about just the overall economic environment. they say there were a lot of challenges that the industry faced during the last year, including continued low interest rates and elevated unemployment. though, they're not necessarily saying great things about what they see in the economy or at least what they had seen over the last year. only comes in one take at a time. >> where, let me see? >> keep going. >> mine does. >> mine over here. >> i got to go pop out into the next thing during the next thing. >> no. wells forgo at this point 34.99 bid. so no longer actually trading higher on this. i don't know what the metric that came out, but two cents ahead on better than expected write now. >> all right. >> okay. >> talk to an analyst. >> we're going to talk to an analyst and get him on the phone. let's get a quick check on the markets. the dow falling -- would open about 12 points lower. nasdaq off by two points. s&p 500 virtually unchanged. overseas in asia, as we do a quick fly around you can see we do have a little bit of bad news. shanghai composite off close to 2% on
it is that they have no intention of doing, anyway. basically, we live in an environment where things are going to continue to change and businesses are going to feel money if they feel there's an end demand that justifies that. there's end demand in china, end demand globally and moderate end demand in the u.s. the reality is businesses have done relatively well for the last two or three years and will continue to. >> real quickly, herbalife later this week will be making a big presentation trying to defend itself from bill ackmann. your thoughts? >> look, i happen to feel that waging your short selling campaign on the air waves a way of dictating stock price, i am personally uncomfortable with. i think it's the wrong way to go about investing because it raises all these questions of are you making a legitimate analysis of the underlying business of the company or are you trying to shift the momentum in order to make money off the stock direction? >> you don't think that bill ackmann is going out, and then selling without us knowing? >> no, i don't believe that. i just don't think that's the
very low. by historical standards. though they are starting to tick up. the default environment is still relatively benign. one of the things that i think gets lost on investors is since 2008 we have refinanced the entire high yield market. there is two ben fritz that from. one is you clearly have a lower interest rate because of lower rates but the second thing we've done is push out maturity. even if there is weakness, which we would not rule out, most companies are pretty well positioned to survive that and they don't have near term mature its. which is always a concern from a high yield investors because, you know, banks can be fickle. we know that. so from a credit standpoint, things are very strong. >> how much go you take into kri consideration, the macro economy, how much does it play when you're putting together a portfolio. >> macro sets the guard rail of the idea. you will deemphasize home builders or building products. right now for example, we are concerned about europe. from the standpoint of credit, we look at european exposure and incorporate that. you can see we
well in the current environment. you can't survive in this industry unless you continue to cut costs. we've got a great track record, frankly, over the last five years of delivering, you know, circa 100 million pounds of cost savings year on year. we intend to do that going forward. >> and joining us with more, founder and managing director at neeve capital. thanks for joining us. how tough is if for the gross? tough for morrison's. we get tesco tomorrow. >> i think it is tough and goes beyond the economy. i think what's happened is to some extent people are prioritizing spending on other things over food. you've seen so much food inflation the last two, three years that people almost prefer to spend it on treat like apple, for example, or clothing. what that actually has meant is people are discovering or rediscovering that it's cool enough to shop, and people have discovered you can get good quality stuff at really much cheaper prices. and i think in other terms, what people are doing is they're shopping on convenience. they want to go? where closer to them. they don't actually lik
something has to be done. that's creating an environment where real change can occur. what's important is for us to look at each other, no matter what side. i have friends on both sides of this issue, and it's the ability for us to get them to see, hey, listen, everybody has pure intent. we all have to want the exact same thing. that young man on earlier, gabby, mark, yourself, myself, we want to make sure our kids are safe, our family, husbands, wives, mothers, fathers are safe, we want to make sure people are respected. we have forgotten that. if you put your fist out and i push on you, what happens? 99% of people are going to push back. i think the most important thing right now is for us to enter the other person's world and say i know their intent is pure. we have one difference, how to do it, and what's encouraging is the vice president today saying, look, we're truly going to sit down and hear from every faction and look at what the solutions are. if we demonize, we'll be having the discussion ten years from now. we've got to step out of it. >> the guest, mr. shapiro tonight, th
to live in that stressful environment. >> bill: you needed to get out of there to clean up? >> that's what ended up happening. i have had the longest period of sobriety since leaving. >> bill: how did you get off? >> i went to rehab. but i went to many rehabs. how did i stay off is more the question. >> bill: okay, go. >> well, i got married. had a family. had children. i have relationships that are more meaningful in my life today like my cousin chris, than the superficial relationships that i spent most of my time nurturing when i was in political life. >> bill: did you go like he did into a structure into a crew this is what you have to do? >> to the best evidence based crossing anyive behavior which is 12 step program. deal with it every single day. >> bill: the book, recover to live, if anybody out there has a problem or knows people who do. check this out. gentlemen, would appreciate you coming. in did you a noble thing. >> appreciate it. >> bill: bernie goldberg on the ethics of printing the names of legal gun owners in the newspaper. berne is is next. aig? we said we were going to
's creating an environment where change can occur. besides the discussions about the how is for us to look at each other, i have friends on both sides of the issue, good friends and it's the ability for us to get them to see listen, everyone has pure intent and want the same thing. that young man that was on earlier, obviously gabby and mark and yourself, we want to make sure our kissed are save and our family and husbands and wives and mothers and fathers are safe and people are respected. we have forgotten that and if you put your fist out and i push on you, what happens? 90% of people push back. the more we polarize, the harder it is to create change. the most important thing is for us to be able to enter the other person's world and say i know the intent is pure. the difference is how to do it. what is encouraging is the vice president today saying look, we are truly going to hear from every faction and look at the solutions. if we demonize, we will be having this discussion years from now. we have to step out of it. >> with my guest, mr. shapiro, the problem is if you try to talk abou
. it costs a lot of money. in this case it is also costing the environment. >>steve: thanks for the cheery report. >> i was at the redskins game so i'm in a bad news. i'm hosting varney together. we're going to have grover norquist. we're going to give him a heart time because i say this fiscal cliff might have been his waterloo. >>steve: in a couple of minutes, the former marine who wrote a scathing letter to dianne feinstein will join us live. >>gretchen: matt damon wants us to believe that fracking is bad in his movie but a secret report says no fracking way. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could a luminous protein in jellyfish, impact life expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment informati
a proper environment in which to do their jobs and that will include making sure that don't ask, don't tell and elimination of don't ask, don't tell is fully implemented. >> with regard to the military budget, he has called the military a bloated organization. chairman of the joint chiefs, martin dempsey, said this week that we are on the brink of creating a hollow force. would a secretary of defense hagel pro-provide over the hollowing out of the defense department? >> the biggest concern with respect to who will league out is this sequester that's hanging like a sword over the department. that's what they had tried -- have to not let that happen but with respect to going in and finding things within the department of defense that perhaps you don't need or you can eliminate, if that's what you mean by bloat, i hope he does find bloat and gets rid of it. >> agree with his characterization that it's bloated? >> bloated doesn't necessarily mean the whole department is bloated. bloated mean there is are probably things in the department that you can take a hard look at and determine whether or
our national security needs are, and make cuts in the environment and housing and transportation, and i just believe that i'm better prepared having just done what i have done to do this. it's not that i'd be the best interim senator ever. just that in these particular circumstances with very complex issues as kind of a continuat n continuation, i'm there and i believe it's very important for us to go after them, for example, on this phony, irresponsible issue on the debt limit and do defense, social security, and medicare. the two most successful anti-poverty programs in history. a at a time when people say we have too much inequality, the notion you would increase equality is nuts, and further -- look, i had some unhappiness when i read about chuck hagel's remarks from 14 years eg which i didn't remember, but now the question is he's a man who is going to help us withdraw from afghanistan and reduce the military. i'm very encouraged by that. my one criticism of the president was he wasn't going far enough in reducing the military. i think people now understand that it's either
, first the committee on the environment and pickup works. and then, more importantly the committee on finance. you know, i could maybe tell the governor some more stories about how i pushed through the biggest tax increase in history 20 years ago, maybe entertain him with some of the funny stuff that happened on the senate floor when the republicans were not half as crazy as they are now. and then beg the governor to appoint me as john kerry's successor in the senate. my point, basically, experience matters. and in the overnight polling, america spoke, spoke clearly in favor of a senator o'donnell. in a poll we conducted on our website i now have a huge lead. a huge lead over anyone else to be appointed senator from massachusetts. 40% want barney frank. only 4% want oscar winner and current oscar contender ben affleck to take time off from living the dream to cast some votes in the senate for a couple of months. and as i stared at the polling today, 51% supported me. as i stared at those results, refreshing the refresh button, as the hundreds of votes were cast i reached for the ph
year for the s&p. it'll get you to 1,550? >> we are in a mid single digit equities environment. it's not horrible as long as you're not expecting something that's, you know, that's 10%. >> look at some of these releases. i'm very impressed with the isms for services. very impressed with capital goods, factory order spending, factories isms, even the employment report showed good hours worked in income. are we underestimating the economy? forget washington, put that aside. >> are you underestimating the economy? it'll be 3% instead of 2%? >> it could be. let's put it this way. if you look, for example, at the cbo budget numbers, they are looking for this thing to get to 3%, 4%, 5%, over the next two or three years, i think those are silly numbers. could we be in the high twos? not without a question. especially if you can unlock this lack of business confidence that's out there, that to me is the most important. >> i love the fact that gold is falling almost on a daily basis. because when gold falls, people are investing in more productive assets. reminds me of the '80s and '90s. >>
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
and get some of the issues out of the way. >> we've lived in this environment for the last 18 months, one big disaster after another. everyone is waiting for the policy response, comes at the 11th hour and 59th minute. this is a pattern everyone has gotten used to but the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling are the last big tail risks we think of the tail risks that we have to worry about, saw we would say once we get past that over the next several months we think it will lift a little bit of a cloud and investors will take risks. >> good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. >> bob, thanks to you as well. ten minutes to go before we close it up. the dow jones industrial average holding on to a gain of 50 points. >> well, this herbalife soap opera is continuing. herb greenberg is coming up. all over the big move in the stock. take a look. up 3.25% right now. we'll show you what's behind it. >> and can you believe the iphone was only introduced five years ago? it is true. five years ago today, in fact, so here's a trivia question for you. the iphone alone is wort
normal, if you will, in a lot of these companies given the fact that the regulatory environment is getting worse and globalization is not necessarily on their side where it was so many years ago? is this going to be the new normal? well, i don't think so. here's the question. will the politicians get it right? will we go over the cliff, another debt ceiling and if we don't we could have a very robust capital markets this year, an that's what encourages me for the big money centers. for the smaller guys starved for loan growth and margin pressures they will be buyers. the really small guys will be the sellers and you'll see a lot of m & a opportunity out here. >> jason this morning you raised estimates on three banks. you lowered estimates on nine banks. tell me what was behind that. you're expecting the quarter to be what, more negative than positive for the sector overall? how do you see it? >> fine tuning here and there with overall estimate. i think generally for the earnings for the quarter. we think about half our banks will beat expectations. half miss. if you think during
are actually behind the counter in dispensaries, and so it's a very safe, secure, highly regulated environment that we operate in. >> okay. so 18 states have now passed medical marijuana laws. 18 states, so you -- you operate -- you operate already in california. you operate in canada. you've got dispensers coming to market in arizona in a matter of weeks. >> correct. >> what when are you likely to break into the remaining states? what's the plan for growth? >> that's a very good question because we are not just about medical marijuana. our technology crosses many boundaries in the traditional pharmacy retailing business, whether it's retail pharmacies, institutional pharmacy plays, doctor offices, hospice, long-term care, so our solution really is very broad scope and has a tremendous value proposition in traditional pharmacy and in traditional health care. in terms of medical marijuana we are on a state-by-state awareness, put if in aware ney. every state sen acting its own laws and regulations so we're currently enacting the rules in recently passed state like connecticut and massachusetts.
's there on the sidelines, and yet this market keeps going higher because of this interest rate environment, because of the easy money from central bankers. do you still see that kind of conviction on -- on the part of big buyers? >> yes, i do, and i think as we said, the global p myois telling you that we're coming from a dismal place. if you bag back to the fiscal collapse that we went through worldwide, particularly i look to china, for the impact that china continues to have on the global economy. the united states is again demonstrating, may not be the growth rate that we want, but it is in fact heading in the right direction which is why the asset class of exsis should come back into favor. we've been out of favor for years at this point. the weekly money flows we just saw, the first time we've seen positive growth. >> exactly. >> i think that money has been spent quite frankly so that's a tough trade, but at this particular point market has digested what it's going to digest. put in a great first two weeks of january, and i believe the money flows should and will continue into the united stat
we like wells fargo a lot. they get hurt in a low rate environment, they'll be helped a tremendous amount when short rates move up, and investors have not yet been willing to believe that the mortgage profits are sustainable. even though wells has got 30% market share of the mortgage market, which over time should be a positive. it's just they're not willing to give them full credit for it yet. >> moshe, thanks for your time. >> thanks very much. >> i did want to discuss some breaking news on morgan stanley. the company, a number of news outlets reporting job cuts coming there. we can confirm and clarify some of those reports. morgan stanley sources close to the company indicating they will cut about 6% of its overall institutional securities, and infrastructure staff. those cuts will total 1,600 jobs, half would be international, half will be domestic. again, 6% of securities and infrastructure. now, putting that in perspective, the company has 57,000 total employees. some have reported 6% overall, that is not correct. again, if you do the math, it would be 1,600 total. they've be
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
's session. nokia on strong surge sales. the company did warn that competitive environment though remains challenging. molly corp plummeting after 2013 revenue and case flows would be weaker than expected due to falling rare earth prices. and super value, which has been in the news lately, says it plans to sell five retail grocery clans to an investor group. the price tag, $3.3 billion. as we continue on power lunch we are waiting for president obama to set to name the white house chief of staff jack lew as new treasury chief. but there are a number of people, including some on the floor, who are afraid of mr. lew, heading up treasury. we will talk about that when we come back as you look at this live picture from the white house. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a he
risk than upside. but clearly, munis, especially in the increased tax environment, still attractive as are some high-yield, some floating rate including some private debt alternative investments to provide some current yield while we continue to sort of muddle along during this first quarter or so in the volatility. hover orr all right, jack, i know you have a lot of etf picks which you often share with us. what is your investment philosophy, strategy in terms of specifics right now? >> sure. i can't disagree with david. i think a lot of those themes, you know, pretty much filter through to what we're doing. but we do think that the emerging markets, you know, trading at a 25% discount to the s&p 500 offer a little bit of insulation in the event that we start our austerity program this year, europe continues their austerity program. yes, there is a little stimulus in japan, but overall i would like to invest in an economy that has, you know, a 6% overnight interest rate that can go lower if they need to. they're running budget surpluses, they've got currency reserves, they can throw
to even entertain something like this in an environment like this. i mean, the whole capital system is burning that they've got control over, and they're doing something goofy like this. >> well, it was the national endowment from the arts, just in case everybody's wondering, that's who's behind this. collected the taxpayer money together and sat down and thought about how should we pirg out how to bestow this upon, you know, worthy folks -- neil: it's clearly aimed at the young. >> oh, yeah. i guess, they want to insure that it's a built-in base of supporters going forward. neil: but the idea being you need more money to fix this problem with money you say we don't have. >> right. we're absolutely broke, but we're going to train kids that they should be battling big oil more than anything else. before you learn how to do math, before you learn how to read, before you learn how to balance your own checkbook, before you learn how to balance the country's checkbook -- which, i admit, is near hi impossible at this -- nearly impossible at this point -- instead let's go out and there and
the submarine n that environment to have the largest insurance company in the world that had written savings protection contracts to thousands, hundreds of thousands of american households and to a bunch of state and local governments to have that inconstitution fail in that environment our judgment would have been catastrophic. >> all right. who's right? >> dishonesty of that statement we saw in the testimony from congress. aig was not saved to protect savings accounts. it was saved so that aig could make its payments that alexis would describe earlier. to the largest too big to fail bank that's made the reckless counter party bet risks on aig and the taxpayer was footing the bill. look, even tim geithner himself in some ways acknowledge that was an unfair thing when he authorized his people to negotiate with the banks to try to have a discount, not 100 cents on the dollar buying securities at a time were worth less than half that amount. it was a half hearted, you know, just terrible effort that it didn't go anywhere. >> we were talking about right before those clips the loss of faith in s
and also the competitive environment. obviously a lot of phones coming out at ces and across the spectrum. but let's be clear. a lot of work hard for nokia. 0% gain is not necessarily the start of a turnaround per se at this company. >> and morgan stanley, if you're thinking about buy microsoft, windows 8 disappointing. i do like to -- a lot of people call in on mad money, they want to talk about low dollar stocks. clearwire. nokia. supervalu, all big wins. typically speculation -- speculation is really bad, we have to be involved with pfizer, you know, you should be in merck. the percentage wins here are staggering and a lot of people hit it big. by the way, sirius worked out, too. >> at the same time when you have a low priced stock like that, there is a great deal of risk and i know you point that out many times. i won't enmention many of these until they pierce that $3 level. >> but i was skeptical and this is one of those rare times where skepticism for supervalu, skepticism for clearwire because it was at a dollar not take long ago and it turns out they're a very valuable company. >
parts of the world. as far as the current environment, it's a good place for them to we, focused on the u.s. even though our growth is not exceptional, it's still solid and better than other markets to be in. >> looking towards next week, morgan stanley, goldman sachs, bank of america out on thursday. what sort of growth rates are we going to see for these guys? how easy is the -- first of all, are they going the be flatted by easy xait comparisons? >> they're going to be very flattered by easy pairsons. there were a lot of eva chavrnlgs where the value of their bonds decreased. so they hurt a lot of their bonds. but sequentially from last quarter, it's not a large growth. 6/it's going to make them look a little better. >> what is going to be the key report for you or the key thing to focus on? >> as far as wells fargo, i would say what they have to say about the housing market. is it going to continue to be overheated? is it going to improve? this is something that affects not only the banks, but other parts of the economy, as well. we've seen in the consumer discretionary secto
there are things the government can do which will improve the environment for expansion. what was interesting is that cfos are relatively happy with monetary policy. >> they tell us credit is lower than it has been focus five years. but the concerns seem to be around things like infrastructure, energy policy and immigration and in particular, the general level of regulation. so what cfos are saying to us is what worries them are things more around the microsooidz side of the economy. >> business hasn't really come up with a view for that, hasn't it? >> we'll see what comes out of that. >> thank you for joining us. if you have any thoughts or comments, please e-mail us, worldwide@cnbc.com. >>> we're getting more details on japan's xlumtry budget. kitadai-san, hello. >> hello, ross. the government has compiled an outstanding for fiscal 2012 valued at more than $14 billion. the new liberal democratic led government plans to spend a large portion of the funds on public projects. the budget will focus on targets to introduce resistant construction standards at schools and hospitals, plus provide f
car, try to save gas and help the environment and they'll still tax you. you really can't make this stuff up. we'll deal with it next and look at this quote. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphy
returns, what you're telling clients for the next three to five years? >> in this environment, we're actually asking our clients to think about three things. first we're going to have low interest rates for awhile. so they need to adjust their expected returns. so in a low interest rate environment we're going to have lower returns across all asset classes. second, we're telling our clients that as they think about the lower returns in the context of their portfolios, they also need to recognize that we are going to have volatility from incremental policy on a global basis. whether it's in the u.s., europe, japan or emerging market countries. we are expecting that policy, whether it's monetary policy adjustments, fiscal policy, it will all be incremental. and that will create market pressure because it won't be at a pace that the markets would like to see. so that will introduce volatility. and it's not something our clients should try to trace. they should look over the horizon and invest for the long run. >> looking at the long run, three to five-year term outlook if you look at
. do it again. do it again. do it again. >> i'm focused with professionals in a controlled environment. to my surprise, lou describes this as a the pussy cat of weapons. >> what'd you think about shooting that? >> reporter: i have to agree with lou, it's a very gentle gun. >> it is. >> reporter: my city has lots of police and lots of gun laws. as a civilian, i can't carry a firearm here. lou, a former cop, can, and never leaves home without one. his concern -- >> they're legislating laws that do not impact the criminal element. in other words, the only people that obey the law are law-abiding citizens. >> reporter: the aurora movie theater shooter used three firearms, one a shotgun similar to this. a single cartridge, multiple pellets, maximum damage. >> you can smell the powder, too. >> absolutely. >> reporter: i'm torn between fascination and fear. i understand self-protection and competitive sport but gun crime is a reality in my city. >> i look at people as being evil, you know? i've never seen a gun jump up on its own and shoot someone. >> reporter: so i change my scenario. if i l
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